Heritage Thermal Services prepares for Earth Day event in East Liverpool

EAST LIVERPOOL, Ohio – After having to cancel last year’s citySweep event, Heritage Thermal Services is pleased to announce that its collection of household hazardous wastes is back for 2021. Final preparations are underway to resume the free community-wide event that the facility started in 1997 to commemorate Earth Day.

The collection of household hazardous wastes, old consumer electronics, light bulbs and batteries will take place at the East End facility on April 24 from 8 a.m. – noon. Residents needing to dispose of expired or surplus pharmaceuticals can drop them off that day at East Liverpool City Hospital from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The hospital is among the citySweep sponsors for 2021.

Household Hazardous Waste Profile Residents are invited to download this profile form and complete it before driving to the facility.

Household Hazardous Waste Flyer More information about the household hazardous waste collection is available on this flyer.

For safety reasons, residents are reminded to pack their materials securely. Smoking, hitch trailers and propane tanks are not permitted onsite. Persons delivering their materials must remain in their vehicles.

Along with the hospital, the City of East Liverpool and the Southern Columbiana County Regional Chamber of Commerce will cleanup several neighborhoods in the city. Tim Hortons and WTOV-TV9 are also sponsors of the Earth Day activities.

Since the first citySweep collection in 1997, East Liverpool-area residents have recycled or disposed of more than 248 tons of household chemical wastes and old electronics that otherwise would have been poured down the drain or tossed in the trash.

Heritage Thermal Services announces environmental grant program for 2021

EAST LIVERPOOL, Ohio – Heritage Thermal Services (HTS) is pleased to announce that applications for its environmental grant program are now available. Schools and non-profit groups within a 15-mile radius of the facility are invited to apply.

Grants in amounts ranging from $100 to as much as $1000 are available for projects that benefit the local environment. A total of $6,500 is available this year.

Applications may be downloaded from this link Environmental Grant Application or by calling 330.386.2194. March 31 is the deadline to apply. Due to the pandemic, grants will be awarded separately to successful applicants.

Last year, eight non-profit groups received a total of $5,500 to help fund their respective green projects. Since the grant program began in 1998, dozens of local organizations have received a total of $106,700 to help keep the community cleaner and greener.

Heritage Thermal Services supports local United Way campaign with annual donation, billboard promotion

EAST LIVERPOOL, Ohio – Heritage President of Incineration Services Christopher Pherson presents the facility’s $2,500 donation to Candy Faloon, executive director of the United Way of Southern Columbiana County. Joining them is Karen Montgomery of Heritage who also serves on the United Way’s board of directors.

The company is a long-time donor to the local United Way, which supports 10 front-line agencies that provide important social services to those in need. Now, perhaps more than ever, the local chapter needs community support to fulfill its mission. The pandemic has caused the cancellation of several fundraising events and the chapter must now count on donations from companies and individuals to meet its goal of raising $90,000.

To help build awareness, Heritage has donated its billboard in East Liverpool’s East End to highlight the campaign. Thousands of motorists pass by the billboard daily.

Heritage billboard promotes United Way fundraising campaign

Heritage billboard promotes the United Way fundraising campaign. 

East Liverpool environment to benefit from Heritage grants

EAST LIVERPOOL, Ohio – The pandemic has caused many events and activities to be postponed or canceled, including the citySweep collection of household hazardous wastes at the Heritage Thermal Services incineration facility. During the collection, which had been held annually since 1997, the company also distributes grants to non-profit groups that help fund their environmental projects.

We are pleased we were able to continue the program despite the economic downturn caused by the novel coronavirus. Out of 16 applications that were submitted, we awarded a total of $5,500 to eight applicants. The organizations receiving grants and a description of their projects follow:

$1,000 – EAST LIVERPOOL ROTARY CLUB: Fund landscaping and beautification projects conducted by the Dolphin Swim Club at the public swimming pool in Thompson Park.

$1,000 – EAST LIVERPOOL TREE COMMISSION: Purchase trees for city’s plan to be designated as a Tree City by the Arbor Day Foundation.

$750 – THOMPSON PARK: Purchase materials for a new restroom facility.

$750 – TOMLINSON RUN STATE PARK FOUNDATION: Support for park improvements and trail maintenance.

$750 – THE BEACON ASSOCIATION: Purchase materials to landscape and maintain the triangle entrance to East Liverpool at West Second Street.

$500 – EAST LIVERPOOL-CALCUTTA AREA GARDEN CLUB: Support for the club’s many community landscaping projects at the Carnegie Library, the Museum of Ceramics, Thompson and Calcutta parks and other public areas.

$400 – CITY OF EAST LIVERPOOL: Fund veterinary services for the city’s spay/neuter program for stray felines.

$350 – BEAVER CREEK WILDLIFE EDUCTATION CENTER: Purchase packs, binoculars and compasses for guests to use while hiking the park.

Since we initiated the environmental grant program in 1998, local non-profits have received a total of $106,700 to keep the community cleaner and greener. We remain committed to supporting the East Liverpool community and remind everyone to stay safe.

Earth Day Pollinator Project in Benton, AR

Prior to the COVID-19 Pandemic, our Benton, Arkansas facility started making plans for Earth Day and for continued employee engagement throughout the summer.  One part of the plan was to start an employee garden to grow fresh herbs and vegetables.  For the garden to be productive, the team considered bringing in a couple of beehives and planting wildflowers.

While we must postpone the employee garden until next year, our maintenance personnel (following facility social distancing guidelines) moved forward with as much of the project as possible.  Before Earth Day, they were able to sow 2 acres of wildflowers.  Additionally, they planted 50 live oak and 50 poplar seedlings!  And now this week the bees have arrived.  Two of our employees will serve as on-site beekeepers.  We will check back in later this summer to check on our wildflower fields and look at all pollinators, including the bees, butterflies and birds.

 

 

Donating Critical PPE & Supplies to Local Businesses

When so many critical facilities are experiencing a shortage of necessary personal protective equipment (PPE) and sanitation supplies, several Heritage locations have stepped up to share.

An employee from our Interactive team shared that a local Indianapolis-area hospital where his wife works had a PPE shortage; “I received word last night that they are currently running very short on gowns to be used in the areas where they are caring for confirmed cases and are reaching the point of beginning to plan for carrying out their duties with limited or recycled PPE,” he said.

With the help of our Supply Chain Director, we were able to purchase and donate 1,050 protective suits to use in place of medical gowns for hospital personnel to the hospital.

In Benton, Arkansas, our team donated single use aprons, nitrile gloves, N95 masks and alcohol wipes to the  University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS).  In the words of VP Ryan Dossey, “The doctors and nurses on the front line deserve the best support that we as a community have to offer and donating PPE to keep them safe in this fight is of utmost importance in these trying times.”

In East Liverpool, an assisted-living facility near our incinerator was reaching out to local businesses and organizations for help sourcing hand sanitizer, a vital resource in this coronavirus environment. Its supplies were running low, retail stocks were depleted, and its pending orders were uncertain.

After reviewing their inventory, our facility was able to assist by donating several boxes of hand sanitizer. Chris Pherson, President of Heritage Thermal, presented the donation, distanced appropriately, to the facility, which is in neighboring Beaver County, Pa.

We can get through this challenging time by working together and supporting our local communities – if you or your company has a surplus of supplies, please consider donating to local businesses who need it.

Helping Our Communities in Times of Need

At Heritage, our mission is to protect human health and the environment, and this extends beyond the scope of our day-to-day business operations. As the Coronavirus triggers an ever-growing number of shutdowns and closures, one of the biggest issues arising is concern for children and food insecurity. One in seven children struggle with hunger, and many students rely on public schools for one or even two of their daily meals. Heritage is dedicated to helping the communities where we live and operate, and making sure they continue to have access to food is one of the best ways we can help during this crisis.

Feeding America has been one of our three corporate charities for the past five years, and they support 40 million people through 200 food banks nationwide. Through their resources we’ve been able to connect with several local food banks in states where we conduct business.

• In Toledo, OH, we donated directly to the Toledo Northwestern Ohio Food Bank Backpack program, which gives kids who qualify for free lunch additional food to take home on Fridays.

• A local church in Tulsa Oklahoma provided a grant to match donations to the local food bank, and with the buying power of Feeding America, our $1,000 donation was doubled, enabling the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma to provide 8,000 meals in the community.

• In Iowa City, our donations will provide 80 boxes of food to kids and families

In total, we’ve donated $25,000 to 25 food banks in 18 different states where we operate, designating the funds specifically for children when possible.

We encourage you to find your local food bank, which you can do by typing in your zip code at https://www.feedingamerica.org/find-your-local-foodbank and donating either nonperishable items or making a monetary donation. Heritage believes in sticking together, and supporting our communities is crucial in times like these. Each donation means more food, an extra volunteer, or more supplies for those in need

 

Wall of thank you letters from healthcare professionals and hospitals for donating food.

Thank you letters to Heritage from the food banks.

Heritage Thermal Services announces environmental grant program for 2020

EAST LIVERPOOL, Ohio – Heritage Thermal Services (HTS) is pleased to announce that applications for environmental grants are now available. Schools and non-profit groups within a 15-mile radius of the facility are invited to apply.

Grants in amounts ranging from $100 to as much as $1000 are available for projects that demonstrate a benefit for the local environment. A total of $6,500 is available for this year.

Applications may be downloaded from this link, Environmental Grant Application, or by calling 330.386.2194. March 31 is the deadline to apply. Grants will be awarded during this year’s citySweep collection of household hazardous waste for East Liverpool area residents on April 25.

Last year, 16 school and non-profit groups received a total of $7,450 to help fund their respective green projects. Since the grant program began in 1998, dozens of local organizations have received a total of $101,200 to help keep the community cleaner and greener.

Heritage helps Stop the Bleed in Columbiana County, Ohio

EAST LIVERPOOL, Ohio – Heritage is dedicated to health and safety through emergency preparedness at all its locations. That commitment also extends into the communities where Heritage operates.

When officials of the Columbiana County Community Emergency Response Team, or CERT, expressed their intent to introduce the trauma-awareness program called Stop the Bleed, officials at the Heritage Thermal Services incineration facility here did not hesitate to respond. The company donated $3,000 so the CERT could acquire training kits and related equipment.

“No matter how rapid the arrival of professional emergency responders, bystanders will always be first on the scene,” Debra Moore, CERT program manager, said. “Those nearest to someone with life-threatening injuries are best positioned to provide first care.”

The Stop the Bleed program is a collaboration between the Department of Homeland Security and other agencies. Stop the Bleed trains ordinary citizens who may be present and a single- or mass-casualty incident to stem severe bleeding in the victim or victims before professional medical- and emergency-responders arrive on the scene. More information is available at: Stop The Bleed.

The CERT announced the donation during a recent meeting of the East Liverpool Rotary Club of which Heritage is a member. Team members also demonstrated the proper use of tourniquets and other first-aid resources to the Rotarians.

According to the CERT: “In Columbiana County, we work under the Emergency Management Agency (EMA). We do not self-deploy for emergencies; instead, we make sure that our own families and neighborhoods are safe and deploy when called out by the EMA.”